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Topic Title: Community Fruit Trees
Topic Summary: What a phenomenal concept
Created On: 07/06/2019 04:48 AM
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 07/06/2019 04:48 AM
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palmtreeg

Posts: 2018
Joined Forum: 04/27/2010

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/07/06/how-to-grow-and-forage-without-owning-land.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20190706Z1&et_cid=DM298457&et_rid=656059122

Imagine the government subsidizing this education and community fruit trees instead of food stamps (40% of which is spent on soda- it's true, the power of coke and Pepsi lobbyists, not to mention the Dia

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Brevard Surf Report
 07/06/2019 04:55 AM
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palmtreeg

Posts: 2018
Joined Forum: 04/27/2010

Betes industry)...imagine the amount of $$$ saved for we the taxpayer...

Anyway, I want to be like this guy, by 1) growing my own foods and 2) looking into this community fruit tree concept, especially as our homeless community continues to grow as well

Anyone having success providing over 80% of your home's produce with home gardening ?

What are the top three fruit trees you would suggest for growing a reliable, quality, good tasting crop beachside Brevard?

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Brevard Surf Report
 07/08/2019 10:08 AM
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RustyTruck

Posts: 20814
Joined Forum: 08/02/2004

Well there are a lot of reasons poor people buy shitty food, some is ignorance and marketing, but most low income areas are "food deserts". Hard to find a "Fresh Market" in the hood, and without a car...

I don't accept this as a replacement for nutritional assistance for the poor, but I think it's a great idea for everyone regardless of income. We grow most of our kitchen/cooking herbs in a 4x6 raised bed, and enough Tomatoes and Kale to supply 80% during the season. But it takes diligence to stay ahead of bugs and do it organically.

I think a better solution would be collective organic farms which would be supported financially or via labor (or ideally some mix of the two) by the participants, but managed with scientific expertise.

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Al Fascismo no se le discute, se le destruye

– Buenaventura Durruti
 07/08/2019 02:47 PM
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palmtreeg

Posts: 2018
Joined Forum: 04/27/2010

Thanks RT!!

You're solution makes complete sense, I like it

Damn, you're killing it on the Kale and Tomatoes, the guy in the video mentioned Everglades tomatoes, what kind are you growing?

Fruit wise on my end, covered on the star fruit, bananas, coconuts, dragon fruit, kumquat, limes, and lemons...

Trying to decide what variety of avocado and mango, as I want to add those in the mix...

BTW, I hope you surfed this am

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Brevard Surf Report
 07/09/2019 05:27 AM
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SurferMic

Posts: 881
Joined Forum: 06/30/2012

long time back I lived in a orange grove that converted 1/2 of the "grove" to a subdivision (Brandon Groves..good times , great neighborhood)...BUT we were kids, the oranges on the trees in the entire neighborhood and outlying farm were nothing but giant baseballs that we plucked and threw at everything , including each other. Yes, no respect but we were just kids...Fast Forward, I planted lemon tree and papaya trees at an apartment complex, same thing ..kids looked at the fruit as projectiles in different stages of ripeness...cut the trees down, tired of seeing fruit splattered around...sadly , kids will be kids...This could be an issue with community trees..... For veggies, too hot in summer for everything but bananas and peepers. Winter, spring, fall we get all our leafy greens from Kale (Curly is the best Dino not so good), swiss chard (really good) lettuce, strawberries, tomatoes, peepers. broccoli and a ton of herbs, green onions is the best producer, but basil, etc. does well...80% easily..Lemon tree always has fruit, Lime tree as well, Mangos no good this year. Papaya always fruiting hard to keep up. NO LUCK with Avocados...guess I am too close to the beach..also way too many coconuts, brought a bunch of nuts back from the keys years ago now it is out of control, must have 15 or more mature coco palms..lot's of work ahead.

Edited: 07/09/2019 at 05:58 AM by SurferMic
 07/09/2019 09:37 AM
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RustyTruck

Posts: 20814
Joined Forum: 08/02/2004

Originally posted by: palmtreeg

Thanks RT!![IMG][/IMG]



You're solution makes complete sense, I like it[IMG][/IMG]



Damn, you're killing it on the Kale and Tomatoes, the guy in the video mentioned Everglades tomatoes, what kind are you growing?



Fruit wise on my end, covered on the star fruit, bananas, coconuts, dragon fruit, kumquat, limes, and lemons...



Trying to decide what variety of avocado and mango, as I want to add those in the mix...



BTW, I hope you surfed this am [IMG][/IMG]



Thanks, I didn't get in the water unfortunately, but the bills will get paid!

Last year I got a lot of Early Girls until caterpillars got ahead of me. This year Better Boy produced a lot for me, but I'm still learning organic and "pick 'em off" pest control. Kale seemed to do great with minimal work, I wish I liked it more. We're still getting some Kale now, but a few months ago we had tons and Swiss Chard also in the 4x6 plot. I don't really have a taste for that one either but I think it's healthy. Broccoli and cabbage did well for us in the community garden too.

If I have surplus next year I'll post it here for anyone who wants some.
Besides eating it and knowing it's "clean", my favorite part is giving it away.

Downside on the tomatoes is you can't go back to Publix. Those are terrible.

Our herbs are sage, basil, thyme (lemon and German), parsley, rosemary, green onions, and culantro. We had great results from the raised bed filled with Green Earth Compost http://www.facebook.com/lovelivingsoil/



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Al Fascismo no se le discute, se le destruye

– Buenaventura Durruti

Edited: 07/09/2019 at 09:38 AM by RustyTruck
 07/09/2019 11:48 AM
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SurferMic

Posts: 881
Joined Forum: 06/30/2012

totally organic here, I just give up 15% of the crop to the insects and try to pull of caterpillars off when I see them...it seems cherry tomatoes are less bothered by insects. Dino Kale can survive summers but it is not that tasty, gets bitter as the season goes on, same with cabbage...one thing that thrives in all seasons is rosemary and parsley... Now this should go without saying but remember to NOT USE pressure treated wood for raised beds....arsenic leaching, seems like a no brainer, but I have seen it done w/ Pressure treated lumber and thought "not a good idea"....that stuff is real bad for you.
 07/11/2019 08:02 AM
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RustyTruck

Posts: 20814
Joined Forum: 08/02/2004

Mine uses pressure treated 4x4s at the corners, but not for the 2x4 frame. It's lined then with galvanized steel. I think the new stuff used for pressure treating isn't arsenic based, but I also used a water sealer.


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Al Fascismo no se le discute, se le destruye

– Buenaventura Durruti
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