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Topic Title: Oak trees may hold antibacterial to help infected citrus trees
Topic Summary: Interesting....
Created On: 01/22/2020 08:54 AM
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 01/22/2020 08:54 AM
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Central Floridave

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Oak trees may hold antibacterial to help infected citrus trees

http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/irre...infected-citrus-trees/
 01/22/2020 09:41 PM
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ww

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A little bit of field research on disease management is being done at Heathcote Botanical Gardens in Ft Pierce. They have an abundance of laurel oaks. Maybe I should plant an orange in my front yard? But then there's canker to worry about.
 01/23/2020 06:27 AM
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Central Floridave

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canker, drought, floods, hurricanes, greening...bleh bleh bleh...meanwhile I'll continue to eat my sweet home grown tangerines every day.
 01/24/2020 07:33 AM
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e11even

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Dave, What type of tangerines are you growing? My lady wants me to plant one. She like those clemintine ones you get in the store( halos, cutties). But not sure what variety grows well here.

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 01/24/2020 12:48 PM
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Aceman

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Honeybells are nice.
Very sweet & exceptionally juicy.

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 01/24/2020 05:28 PM
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Central Floridave

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Dancy, honey-murcott, sunburst. recommend all three.

Edited: 01/24/2020 at 05:30 PM by Central Floridave
 01/28/2020 05:32 AM
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e11even

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Thanks. I remember seeing some of those at lowes recently. Are one of those varieties more like the Halos where they are easy to peel and have the segments?

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Edited: 01/28/2020 at 05:39 AM by e11even
 01/28/2020 09:04 AM
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Plan B

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Originally posted by: e11even Thanks. I remember seeing some of those at lowes recently. Are one of those varieties more like the Halos where they are easy to peel and have the segments?
Dancy.... I had one that was awesome. Best tangerines I've ever had.... even my dog would sit by the tree and beg for one before his morning walk. ha...... was a small tree but big producer for years, then it started going to shit (I guess greening?) and was finally TKO'd after the Matthew flood. I plan to plant another in the spring.... btw my yard is loaded with oaks, and only 2 small areas with enough light for citrus trees.
 01/28/2020 10:04 AM
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Central Floridave

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Although you won't get maximum fruit citrus will fruit in shade.

Tropical Storm Fay's 24 inches in 24 hours flood killed most of my citrus. I just keep planting until one takes. They can croak easily, but sometimes you get one that takes hold and thrives.

Fertilize mid-feb. Once established, never water. I don't water. I mulch mine.

The halos are californian grown in nurseries and well cared for and selected. Prob sprayed with fungicide and growth harmones and artificial light. Just guessing. You won't get a perfect fruit like that growing outdoors in the backyard. Sometimes you get lucky though. Yes, all three I mentioned peel easy. The dancy the easiest. There are seeds though. but big whoop. Those californian variety also are protected from getting pollinated to prevent seeding. I do pick up some of those halos and cuties when off season of my trees. They are pretty great fruit!
 01/29/2020 05:43 AM
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Plan B

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Actually....yeah, now that I think of it Fay was the beginning of the end for me too.... My yard sits VERY low, but right before that storm, the adjacent yard that sat lower (in the direction of drainage) backfilled the shit out of the lot and basically flooded my yard. I had building dept guys come out.... "well citrus tress dont like having wet feet "(tree was loaded with fruit)..... "EXACTLY!.... flooding was never a problem until that mess!" I will plant another Dancy though...
 02/20/2020 05:07 AM
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Central Floridave

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My citrus are starting to bloom this week. I hit them up with a bit of fertilizer last weekend and with the recent rain hoping for another decent crop this year.

I may be getting lucky. I have lost some citrus and they don't thrive like they use to.

However, I do believe and I practiced this the past 20 years is that the mid-Feb fertilizer is the most important. pre-flower.
 03/01/2020 12:22 AM
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ww

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I shoulda taken a photo or two, but Heathcote Botanical Gardens in Ft Piece, which has been hosting test plantings for USDA, now has some recently-planted citrus under the laurel oaks.
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